Consumer chatbot adoption facing some hurdles

While artificial intelligence and chatbots are clearly proving useful for retailers when it comes to improved customer enagement and experience, consumers are not quite big fans.

A PointSource study reveals that while consumers are getting familiar with AI, there remains a gap regarding understanding and accepting applications, such as chatbots.

The report revealed that when AI is present, 49 percent of consumers are willing to shop more frequently and 34 percent will spend more money, according to a press release. The study, "Finding Common Ground Between Consumers and Artificial Intelligence," surveyed 1,000 U.S. consumers and found that while 90 percent of consumers feel companies are prepared to best use chatbots, over half (54 percent) say they would still rather talk to a customer service representative.

"Services like recommendations from Amazon and Facebook Ads have done a good job of warming people up to the idea of AI in their everyday lives — normalizing it through seamless digital experiences that ultimately take place beneath the surface without the user realizing it," said Barry Pellas, chief technology officer at PointSource, a Globant company, and vice president of technology, for the AI Studio, in the release.

"However, this has also created a gap in how consumers understand the technology. Businesses are investing millions of dollars in AI and chatbot technology with the goal of improving the customer experience. But all that effort is useless if the consumer doesn't understand it. As chatbots continue to be incorporated into digital experiences, businesses can serve as a bridge between consumers and a better understanding of chatbots so that those AI investments are valuable to the end user and business."

 


Topics: Augmented Reality, Robotics / AI, Stats and Facts, Technology, Trends / Statistics


Sponsored Links:


Related Content


Latest Content

Get the latest news & insights


News

Resources

Trending

Features

How Ocado masters e-commerce grocery in the UK